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Encompass Kashgar Pakistan Heritage Nature Culture

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Duration

51 days, 51 nights

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Tour Type

Specific Tour

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Group Size

16 people

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Languages

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Overview

Experience the best of Western China and Northern Pakistan’s scenic nature and culture on this 35-day package. Discover the cities of Tashkurgan and Kahsgar, the charming town of Sur and an authentic Yurt house, and the stunning nature of Altai Mountains of Northern Xinjiang, a desert oasis, and one of the largest best lakes deserts in the world.Our guide and local experts will share an intriguing combination of the region’s attractions and hidden secrets. Meet the oldest civilization of Indus and get into the spirit of bygone times when travelling to there.

Departure Dates 

2020 Departures

May :  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

June:  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

July :  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

August : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

September : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

October : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

November : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

2021 Departures

May :  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

June:  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

July :  1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

August : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

September : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

October : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

November : 1st,  5th, 10th, 15th, 20th, 25th

 

Difficulty Level: Easy

Apart from the Ordinary.

10 Great reasons to choose Vertical Explorers Trips:


1. Beautiful Hotels, Properties, and More
We stay in some of finest properties, and where possible, we offer a choice of hotel and room categories. We carefully select prime locations that offer wonderful views, amenities, and proximity to attractions. In remote locales, we revel in knowing that we are enjoying the best accommodations available.
2. The Best Travel Experts
Our legendary Travel Experts carefully watch over the smallest details to ensure that you have a wonderful time. They also draw upon years of established V E relationships to ensure that your journey is seamlessly enjoyable and memorable.
3. Epicurean Choices Abound
We believe travel is made better by experiencing culture you can taste. Our Dine-Around program provides you with the freedom to choose renowned restaurant, an inviting neighborhood eatery, or room service at your hotel its all included.(Subject to Package)
4. Small Group Advantages
Limited to just 10 guests averaging around 7-8 our small group size sets the highest standard in personal service. Our journeys remain intimate and create camaraderie, yet allow for independence, flexibility and discovery. Along the way, we re granted access to exclusive events and stay in one-of-a-kind accommodations not available to larger groups.
5. Experts Offer In-Depth Enrichment
Expert local guides to share their experiences and insights about the cultures and places you explore.
6. The Best Wonders
We visit nook and corner of the country. We travel on aircraft, jeep, horse and legendary trains, Whatever your choice, we likely have something to fit your sense of adventure.
7. Responsible Eco Tourism Policy

Vertical Explorers is committed to adopting a responsible attitude to the areas we visit. We are guests of the communities visited and with some thought and care we can ensure that everyone benefits from the experience. We have developed a Responsible Tourism policy which aims to ensure that V E and its clients act in a way that is socially, environmentally and culturally sound. All areas of our operations are planned with responsible tourism in mind, and we require our business partners to support this vision.
8. Unforgettable Moments
Part of what makes a Vertical Explorers trips so special are the surprises and delights along the way. Unexpected doors open and lead to the kind of authentic cultural experiences that make unforgettable memories.
9. Guaranteed Departure Dates 
Plan with confidence knowing that once your deposit is accepted, your departure date is confirmed. Our journey dates are timed to take advantage of local flavors, special events, natural occurrences or simply the best weather.
10. It’s All – Not about the Money

Our prices are competitive and good value, and we offer quality, service, security and an ethical stance on tourism. We don’t want to be so expensive to run fewer trips and have our staff idle, but on the other hand we believe that running  cheap trips that promote the practice of skimming budgets would result in the porters getting next to nothing, which is something we cannot consider. Additionally we plan treks with sufficient rest days and with achievable daily altitude increases which gives good time to acclimatise. Reducing the number of days may make the price cheaper but the chances of successfully completing the trek also greatly reduce.

Besides the finest accommodations, all meals and sightseeing your escorted Journey includes:
� A professional travel Expert, dedicated and attentive to your needs throughout your journey
� Small group size that allows for personal enrichment, exclusive access and flexibility
� Our unique Dine-Around program
� Unique experiences that allow for a real cultural understanding
� Expert local guides, such as archaeologists and professional naturalists
� All the extra comforts that make sightseeing a personal experience, like a guaranteed window seat and complimentary refreshments along the way
� Itinerary can be customized build your exact dream trip. Customize My Itinerary
� Leaves any day you desire. Lengthen or shorten trip, if you like.
� Best itinerary in terms of acclimatization, enjoyment and safety with options of extensions.
� Lowest Price and best value for money –Save 40-50 % vs. comparable tours of this same quality.
� Group Discounts Available. [ Details ]

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HIGHLIGHTS

  • See the best of Pakistani, Huns, Tajik and Ughur culture & nature
  • In depth local and authentic experiences
  • Enjoy varied traditional Pakistani, Kashgari cuisines
  • Experience local life at Villages, deserts and mountains
  • Pass through indigenous villages & see the local life
  • Visit the “Junction point of highest congregation of Mountains of the World”
  • Cross World highest land border at Khunjerab (at above 4000 m)
  • Explore colonial architecture in Pakistan
  • Discover Lahore and Kashgar Pakistan and China’s engaging and vibrant cities
  • Fall in love with the sights, sounds and tastes of Pakistan
  • Barter for rare items (precious stones & handicrafts etc) at shops
  • Lowest Price and best value of money --Save 40-50 % vs. comparable tours of this same quality.
  • Dream trip can be.......Itinerary can be customized.
  • Guided by highly experienced professionals with the help of the best supporting staff available in Baltistan, having undergone on the job training over many seasons with us. They are highly experienced at catering to the needs of our members, and do a tremendous amount to contribute to the overall success and satisfaction of our groups.

Itinerary

Day 01: Arrival in Kashgar China
Day 01: Arrival in Kashgar China

Welcome to Kashgar! You will be greeted by an English-speaking assistant at the airport after immigration and custom. The assistant will escort you to bus for your hotel. We will have ample time for sightseeing and shopping in colorful old bazaars of Kashgar. The rest of the day is free at leisure.

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 02: Kashgar City

After breakfast our first visit will be the Mausoleum of Apak Hoja, an ancient Islamic building complex and a cemetery of five generations of famous Sufi masters were buried. This Mausoleum is known as fragrant concubine tomb whom was the wife of Emperor Qianlong of Qin Dynasty.
Explore the rich, endless culture of the Uighurs in Kashgar. First enjoy the famous livestock market which happens only on every Sunday and people bring their horses, sheep, goats, camels,cows, bulls and other livestocks to the market from all the directions for sale. It provides a great opportunity to take photos of the faces of local people, enjoy the traditional local market culture, test-drive a donkey or a horse or even make its shoes. Like opening a window, today is a real glimpse into a time lost in the annals of the Silk Road’s past and an opportunity not to be missed.
Later move on to Sunday market main Bazaar which is considered one of the largest market in Central Asia. From fluffy sheepskin hats to rugged camel-hide boots, not to mention beads, buttons and buckets of locals. Everything – including plenty of kitchen sinks – is for sale at this fairytale bazaar. It is the best chance to practice your bargaining skills.
After lunch visit the Grand Id Kah mosque, the largest mosque in China and marvel at the intricate architecture of Kashgar’s historic Apak Hoja Tomb which is also known as Fragrant concubine tomb).
We’ll enjoy the Old Town of Kashgar by walk. walking is the best way to see and understand the ancient historical parts,streets,handicraft workshops and many more;enjoy a century-old Kashgar tea house’s atmoshpere for a short break. sitting by the locals and try various medicinal teas such as those containing rose, saffron, honey and many other ingredients.
Finally wrap up our city tour with a dinner at a local family which offers a great opportunity to deeply understand real local life of uighurs.

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 03: Drive to Karakul Lake - Tashkurgan
Day 03:  Drive to Karakul Lake - Tashkurgan

Today we drive to Karakul Lake along the famous Karakorum highway. The scenery along the way is breathtaking. We will be stopping at the Lake where you can enjoy the view of Muztagh-ata Mountains. Optional camel ride or walk around the Lake. Later we continue to Tashkurgan the last Tajik Chinese town between China and Pakistan.

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 04: Drive Scenic Pamir to Khunjerab Pass - Cross China/Pakistan Border- Passu Gojal Valley Pakistan
Day 04: Drive Scenic Pamir to Khunjerab Pass - Cross China/Pakistan Border- Passu Gojal Valley Pakistan

After border formalities at China side, we drive to the world’s highest paved border crossing, the Khunjerab pass (4750 m height) between Pakistan and China.

Today’s major drive will take us to Khunjerab Pass, Khunjerab Pass, the gateway between China & Pakistan via the Karakoram Highway, is at 4,934m.which half of the park is above 4,000m. Khunjerab National Park is Pakistan’s third largest national park. It is adjacent to Tashkurgan Natural Reserve (1,400,000ha) in China.

It gives some of spectacular sceneries for photographers of wild life. where you may have a sighting of endangered Marco Polo sheep, which is only found in this area in Pakistan. The park is also famous for its snow leopards. Some reports say that it might contain the highest density of these beautiful cats in the total Himalayan ecosystem, which is the natural habitat of these cats. Over 2,000 Siberian ibex, widely distributed and abundant in the park but absent from neighbouring China, are also present here.

Other animals of this park are in the park include:

Snow leopard (T), Himalayan ibex (C), Brown bear (T), Tibetan red fox (C), Tibetan wolf (T), Blue sheep, Marco Polo sheep, Tibetan wild ass or kiang , Ermine (C), Alpine weasel, Stone martin (C), Golden marmot (C), Lynx (unconfirmed reports), Large-eared pika (C), Dhole (unconfirmed reports), Cape hare (C), Common field mouse (C), Royle’s mountain vole (C), Lesser shrew (C), ,Migratory hamster (C)

Birds

Common birds in the park are:

Lammegier vulture, Golden eagle, Himalayan griffon vulture, Eurasian black vulture, Marsh harrier, Eurasian sparrow hawk, Eurasian kestrel, Lesser kestrel, Saker falcon, Peregrine falcon, Himalayan snow cock, Snow partridge, Chukar, Grey heron, Common sandpiper, Hill pigeon, Snow pigeon, Northern eagle owl, Eurasian cuckoo, Common swallow, Magpie, Alpine chough, Raven

The drive is compensated by the beautiful scenery along the Karakoram highway. The journey on the Karakoram Highway is most exciting and thrilling. It is a monument to the engineering feast and one of the most spectacular roads and the world’s highest metaled border crossing. It connects Pakistan and China stretching over a distance of 1300km between Islamabad and Kashgar, winding through three mountain ranges and following the ancient Silk route along the Indus Valley to the Chinese border at Khunjerab Pass.On the way, you will view the awesome mountain ranges of the Karakorum and Kunlun mountains.

After immigration formalities at Sost (border town Pakistan side) you will we proceed to Passu Glacier, Husaini and Attabad lake. The glaciers are really eerie, almost alive, as they creak and melt in the sun. Rocks continually fall down as the ice melts.Experience the passu glacier cracking and spikes from the view point.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,

Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 05: Drive to Attabad Lake - Borit Lake - Gulkin Glacier - Passu Glacier- Gulmit - Hunza
Day 05:  Drive to Attabad Lake - Borit Lake - Gulkin Glacier - Passu Glacier- Gulmit - Hunza

After breakfast From here well go to visit the Gulmit Village, which will offer a nice experience while walking through the streets and between its traditional homes, a real image representing the old and traditional culture of this area. it gives some of spectacular sceneries for photographers. We will also visit Borit lake, Husaini bridge, Passu Glcaier and Gulkin glacier.
The valleys of Hunza and Nagar are some of the most beautiful valleys in the northern parts of Pakistan. The people of this area are known for their legendary good health, longevity and hospitality.

In Hunza valley, Baltit Fort is an ancient fort in the Hunza valley in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Founded in the 1st CE, it has been on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative list since 2004.

In the past, the survival of the feudal regime of Hunza was ensured by the impressive fort, which overlooks Karimabad. The foundations of the fort date back to 700 years ago, with rebuilds and alterations over the centuries. In the 16th century the local prince married a princess from Baltistan who brought master Balti craftsmen to renovate the building as part of her dowry. Visit around the area, you would feel as if you’d stepped back in time in past period.


Drive: 2-3 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 06: Hunza valley Sightseeing

Early morning after breakfast start journey towards Hunza valley.Morning visit to Baltit Fort. Baltit Fort is an ancient fort in the Hunza valley in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Founded in the 1st CE, it has been on the UNESCO World Heritage Tentative list since 2004.In the past, the survival of the feudal regime of Hunza was ensured by the impressive fort, which overlooks Karimabad. The foundations of the fort date back to 700 years ago, with rebuilds and alterations over the centuries. In the 16th century the local prince married a princess from Baltistan who brought master Balti craftsmen to renovate the building as part of her dowry. Visit around the area, you would feel as if you’d stepped back in time in past period.

After Baltit Fort you go to Ganish village. Ganish is the oldest and first settlement on the ancient Silk Road in Hunza, and is the site of various ancient watch towers, traditional mosques, religious centers, and a reservoir.The Ali Gohar House in Ganish, is located next to one of the iconic shikaris (watchtowers) of the town. The 400-year-old house was awarded the UNESCO Asia-Pacific Awards for Cultural Heritage Conservation in 2009

Then we proceed to Altit Fort. Altit Fort is an ancient fort at Altit town in the Hunza valley,It was originally home to the hereditary rulers of the Hunza state who carried the title Mir.Altit Fort and in particular the Shikari tower is around 1100 years old, which makes it the oldest monument in the Gilgit–Baltistan.

Then go up to the highest observation place at Duikar to enjoy 360-degree panoramic view and sunset reflections on peaks of lady finger, Haramosh peak, Rakaposhi and many others. This is one of the best elevated way to fully enjoy a sunset. Spiritually and physically, we would like you to feel the air as well. It will be unforgettable experience.

Drive: 2-3 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast

Day 07: Hunza - Nagar Excursion
Day 07:  Hunza - Nagar Excursion

Today well have a full day sightseeing tour of Hunza and its surroundings. Our morning session will include a jeep excursion to the Nagar Valley to see the glacial formations at Hoper. Hoper also offers a fantastic view of the mountain peaks of the Hunza valley. After we return to Hunza we will take a walk through the Karimabad Bazaar, the down town of Hunza.

Drive: 3-4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 08: Drive to Naltar Valley - Upper and Lower Naltar Lakes (Satrangi Lakes)
Day 08:  Drive to Naltar Valley - Upper and Lower Naltar Lakes (Satrangi Lakes)

After breakfast, we will start our journey towards Naltar on KKH with en route stop at Rakaposhi View point, which offers a superb view of Rakaposhi Peak.Rakaposhi accessible only by 4 to 5 hrs, walk from the road, dominates the whole valley. This area is full of apricots, apples, grapes and peaches. we will go to scenic Naltar valley, home to flowery meadows, lakes and spectacular greenery. The peaks surrounding Naltar Valley have dozens of 5000m summits. Naltar was a British hill station and has some Pakistan military facilities, including a Pakistan Air Force winter survival school with ski lift
Naltar receives more rainfall than other mountains/valleys in the range , and its alpine forests are refreshing compared to the mainly arid Karakoram.
We will visit Naltar view point.



Drive 3- 4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 09: Drive to - Gilgit -Rondu Valley - Skardu

After Breakfast, we will start our journey towards Skardu through Giglit.

After a brief stop in gilgit we will continue our journey towards Skardu via scenic Rondu valley.

SKARDU is the administrative capital of Baltistan and gateway to the high peaks of Northern Pakistan. We have some time to explore the town and enjoy the hustle and bustle in peak season of tourists here. Sightseeing in Skardu and surrounding areas during the day. For those seeking a good overview of Skardu, or a place from which to photograph the sunset, Kharfocho Fort is an ideal spot. If the flight is unable to operate because of bad weather, we will resort to travel by road on Karakoram Highway (KKH) to Chilas. We pass through the historical town of Taxila, beautiful hill station of Abbottabad, quake affected lush green towns of Mansehra, Shinkiari and finally meet the great Indus on Thakot Bridge. From there onward the road snails along the bank of the Indus with contrasting landscape after every two kilometers. Standing at around 1,000 m. you see a mountain which rises to above 8,000 m! This is the largest land escarpment in the world. This is also where the three greatest mountain ranges meet; Himalaya, Hindukush and Karakoram.

Drive 9 -10 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,

Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 10: Drive to Kachura Lakes (upper and Lower Kachura)

Today we will visit Lower kachura (shangrila) and upper kachura lakes. Lower Kachura lakes is known as Shangrila Lake, teeming with brown trout. During spring many exotic and colourful flowers adorn its banks, while peach, apricot and apple trees are laden with blossoms in April. Later in the summer one can taste the apples, which are a particularly delicious variety. Enjoy Boating and angling here. Enroute visit Skardu Cold desert to watch the highest altitude dune deserts in the world.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 11: Drive to Shigar Valley
Day 11: Drive to Shigar Valley

Today we rise early and view the beautiful sunrise against the backdrop of the Karakorm. After breakfast drive to Shigar, a history-soaked medieval town. Enroute we will visit Shigar sand dunes. These are on other side of the Indus, impressive sand dunes are visible. It is on the way to Shigar valley, but around 2 km away from the road.

After sand dunes visit, we will continue our drive toward Shigar passing through historic Buddhist Stupa ruins, which is no more in preservation. At Shigar view point, we will stop to take photos of Shigar valley and Blind lakes and sand duens on other side of Shigar River.

Shigar Valley is the gateway to the great mountain peaks of the Karakorams, Gasherbrum & K-2, Broad Peak, Biafo and Baltoro Glaciers, Snow lake, Mashabrum, Trango Tower and other hunderds of 7000m peaks. Shigar valley, formerly known as “Rome of Baltistan” has gentle, irrigated slopes are filled with terraces of wheat, maize and barley. Its orchards of apricots, mulberries, peaches, plums, pears, apples and nuts are unique to Baltistan. The wooden mosque in the middle of the town was built by Kashmiri carpenters several hundred years ago.

There is also a heritage Palace cum Fort (Fong khar ). Completely renovated by the AKCSP a few years back, the Palace and its suburbs reflects a medieval look. Here we will pay a brief visit to the Garden House, Royal room, museum handicraft shop and The Khanqah Moalla, famous for its uniquely carved wooden windows and meditation cells. Shigar retains a mystical, medieval aura that may leave you feeling like you have stepped through the looking glass.

Evening drive back to Skardu.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 12: Drive to Khaplu Valley
Day 12: Drive to Khaplu Valley

Today after breakfast we will drive to Khaplu valley. This beautiful valley of the Shyok River is 103 km east of Skardu. Khaplu is the starting point for most trekking and climbing expeditions. Many famous mountains such as Masherbrum, Saltoro, Sia Kangri, K-6, K-7 are located here. There is a Palace of Raja of Khaplu and remains of Thors.

Khaplu is the administrative capital of the Ghanche District of Gilgit-Baltistan. visit Khaplu Palace and Khaplu view point. We will make a trip to Chaqchan Mosque.

The Masjid Chqchan means the Miraculous mosque in Khaplu, Baltistan built by Mir Sayyid Ali Hamadani or by Shah Syed Muhammad Nurbakhsh Qahistani Sufi in 1370(A.D) is one of the oldest mosque in Baltistan and Pakistan. It is one of Baltistan’s most famous landmarks and a major tourist attraction. The Government of Pakistan also listed the inclusion of the Chqchan Mosque as a Pakistan Heritage Site. After this we will visit Saling Fish Point. Here we can enjoy angling.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 13: Drive to Deosai National Park, Sheocer Lake - Rupal valley, Nanga Parbat Rupal Face
Day 13: Drive to Deosai National Park, Sheocer Lake - Rupal valley, Nanga Parbat Rupal Face

Today early morning departure for Deosai, Located in the Great Himalayan Range, conveniently placed between the western massif of the Himalayas and the central Karakoram. It’s stunning scenic views of the snow-clad mountains and streams, natural beauty and impressive grandeur have made it world famous. Spread over an area of 3,000 square kilometres, at an altitude of 13,500 feet above sea level, the plains are home to unique species of plant and animal life, of which the Himalayan Brown Bears are the most famous. In the words of Aleister Crowley, “In front of us lay the Deosai, an absolutely treeless wilderness of comparatively level country framed by minor peaks. It gives a unique impression of desolation. I have never seen its equal in this respect elsewhere.” To the south of and visible from both the Burji and Satpara approaching areas is a 700-foot hill, on top of which is a 500 foot-high-rock cairn. This unnamed hilltop in the northern deosai region produces a clear panorama of the Himalayan Kangri Range and sections of the Karakoram. As you ascend its gentle, grass covered slopes, Nanga Parbat will come into view far to the west of you. In ‘Gypsy Davy’s’ words, “It was such an expanse of immensity as I have hardly imagined…It seems you cannot talk in a matter-of-fact way in a place like that…I thought the Sierras were large, but here, where we could see three or four score miles north, south, east and west, and see only mountains, and most of them above twenty thousand feet, the Sierras seem like sand dunes”. Shaucer lake (3-4 hours from Skardu), Shatong nala (2 hours) , Bara Pani (two and half hours) and Kala Pani (3 to 3-30 hours) are the most visited spots in Deosai. Deosai is one of the best trout fishing spot in the North.

In the afternoon we will drive via Chilim to Rupal valley and stay overnight at Traishing, south face of Nanga Parbat. The Rupal Valley is located in the Astore District. It lies just south of 8,126 meter Nanga Parbat and is popular for treks to the mountain’s Rupal Face, one of highest mountain faces in the world. The Rupal is home to Shina speaking herdsmen, who have grazed and harvested wood in the valley for hundreds of years. Overgrazing has caused some loss of vegetation, leading to wind-blown dust. Towering peaks on either side of the valley make it a breathtaking, albeit remote destination for adventurers.

Activities Sightseeing, Wild life watching, Angling
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 14: Nanga Parbat South Face - Rupal Glacier - Rama Astore
Day 14: Nanga Parbat South Face - Rupal Glacier - Rama Astore

After breakfast, we traverse to Rupal glacier and then drive to Astore valley and Rama lake .
Astore valley, adjoining the eastern side of mountain Nanga Parbat, is about 120 km (75 mi) long, having area of 5,092 km2 (1,966 sq mi).
Rama lake and pastures are the most famous tourist attraction in the region. Due to its diverse landscape and climatic conditions the valley provides excellent habitat for a variety of commercially important medicinal plants. Rama Lake is a lake near Astore in Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. It is on the top of the beautiful Astore Valley, with a light cover of oak trees and other greenery. The region has low average rainfall and low vegetation cover hence the loss of forest cover is of a very serious concern.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 15: Drive to Tato and Hike to Fairy Meadows
Day 15: Drive to Tato and Hike to Fairy Meadows

Early in the morning drive through the narrow gorge of the Indus River and KKH to Raikot Bridge.
From here jeep on narrow Road to Tato. Hike for 3-4 hours to Fairy Meadows.

Walk: Distance: 10 Km, Ascent: 10 m, Descent: 310 m
Time: 06-07 hrs, Grade: Moderate, Altitude: 3050 M

Activities: Trekking
Meals provided: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Accommodation: Mobile Camp

Day 16: Trek to Nanga Parbat Base Camp and back to Fairy Meadows
Day 16: Trek to Nanga Parbat Base Camp and back to Fairy Meadows

Hike up to Nanga Parbat base camp and back to Fairy Meadows.


Walk: Distance: 10 Km, Ascent: 500 m, Descent: 500 m
Time: 06-07 hrs, Grade: Moderate, Altitude: 3050 M
Activities: Trekking
Meals provided: Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner
Accommodation: Mobile Camp

Day 17: Hike down to Tato, Jeep to Raikot and Drive to Gilgit and Punial Valley

After breafast hike town to Tato, and then jeep to Riakot Briddge and drive to Gilgit, neroute stopping at the Meeting point of three mountain ranges(Karakoram, Hindukush and Himalaya) of world. In Gilgit Visit Kargah Nala, Old Gilgit town home visit for cultural insight.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 18: Excursion to Ishkoman valley

Today after breakfast, we will drive to Chatokhand.Fom Chatorkhand, which is the headquarters of Ishkoman valley, a road leads to Immit, which is about 25 km from Chatorkhand. Before getting to Immit, one passes by the scenic and picturesque villages of Dain, Pakora, Ishkoman and so on. Immit is gateway to Afghanistan and the Pamir Wakhan Corridor.
Ishkoman is endowed with lurking glaciers, calm and serene lakes and the Karambar river on whose left bank is situated impressive Immit which rises in Afghanistan and joins the Ishkoman river below Immit village. The Ishkoman River joins the Gilgit River at Gahkuch. One has to cross the town of Gakuch to enter into the valley of Ishkoman.There are many peculiarities of Immit, one being a hot spring and the other being the identity of the village as a melting pot of different cultures.

The hot spring of Immit is invariably filled with locals and people from nearby villages who come to take a bath in the hope of receiving healing from the waters. People of Pakora, Dain and Ishkoman villages frequently come to the spring along with their family and sometimes stay a night there. Separate rooms have been built for men and women. In their leisure time, the people of Immit come to the hot spring – not always to bathe, though. Sometimes, they go there to sit by the side and gossip.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 19: Yasin Valley Excursion

After breakfast drive to Yasin valley passing through Sandi village and Yasin village. Visit Darkot village and Darkot glacier. Today we will also visit a Darkot village home for cultural exploration.Darkut is a historical place as it has been a passage way for important persons. It was this pass that George Hayward crossed in 1870 when he was murdered. The Chinese army lead by a Korean General crossed Darkut in 747AD and conquered Gilgit. Sandi is the largest village in Yasin valley and it is famous for a Fort from the time of Gohar Aman.It’s attractive villages, carefully cultivated fields and orchards offer a blend of life time experience in remote valleys of Hindukush.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 20: Drive to Phander Lake valley

After breakfast we will drive through Ghizer valley to phander lake.Visit Phander lake and optional trout fishing activity there. Visit Phander village and a home there for cultural insight of Wakhi culture.Phander valley which is commonly called “Little Kashmir”. Phander Lake is one of the most famous tourist spots in the entire region. Phander valley was the bread basket for the whole Northern Areas. The name of Ghizer comes from the name of a village ‘Ghizer’ that is situated in the vicinity of Phander The deep blue lake in Phander offers a magnificent view and is basically the home of trout fish.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 21: Drive over Shandur Pass 3700m and Lake to Mastuj valley

After a morning sightseeing around Phander, we will start to drive towards Shandur pass and Lakes.

Shandur Top (3,700 m)) located in Ghizer District, Gilgit-Baltistan, Pakistan. Shandur is often called the ‘Roof of the World’. The top is flat, a plateau. The grade is very gradual, and the area is crossed by plentiful small streams during summer. The boundary line between Ghizer District and Chitral District is also situated in Shandur Top.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 22: Drive to Chitral Valley

Today morning from Mastuj valley we will drive to Chitral passing through the scenic Booni villages, stopping enroute for rest and visiting local village house to upper Chitral Mastuj.

The main villages include Buni, Mastuj, Chuinj, Parkusap, Reshun, Parwak, Kuragh and Aveer. Mastuj is one of the most beautiful towns in Chitral. It is with an altitude of 2359 metres (7742 feet), starts right after the end of Baranis, Reshun, Kuragh, Buni, Aveer, Parwak, Mastuj, Chinar, Chuinj, Chapali, Kargin are the main areas of Mastuj valley.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 23: Drive to Garam Chashma ( Hot Spring ) Valley

Leave for Garam Chashama (hot spring). On the way visit beautiful villages, with beautiful terraced fields, wild flowers, studded slopes and fruit laden trees. The last destination of Latoh valley in Chitral, which is ideal for hiking, trekking and trout fishing as well as for swimming and bathing.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 24: Garam Chashma and Side valley Excursions

After breakfast visit further up the valley in Garam Chasham or day at leisure.

Activities: Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 25: Drive to Kalash valley

Today we leave to the most exciting part of our tour is visit to Kalash Valley, the home of the Kafir-Kalash or “Wearers of the Black Robes”, a primitive pagan tribe. Their ancestry is enveloped in mystery and is the subject of controversy. A legend says that five soldiers of the legions of Alexander of Macedonia settled in Chitral and are the progenitors of the Kafir-Kalash.

The Kalash women wear black gowns of coarse cloth in summer and hand-spun wool dyed in black in winter. Their picturesque headgear is made of woolen black material decked out with cowry shells, buttons and crowned with a large colored feather.You can also visit a typical Kalash house to observe their life style and Kalasha Museum in Bumboret.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 26: Kalash valley

Today is reserved for a local cultural exploration day. Or optionally day hike over to the other village of Kalash Valley, for our lunch we will be having packed light lunch with us with some juices and biscuits. It’s a magnificent short trek into the beautiful Birrer.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: Cultural exploration , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 27: Drive to Kumrat Valley - Thal

We leave today after breakfast for Kumrat valley, one of the scenic valleys of Khyber Pakhtunkhwa, and a picturesque spot for travelers.

Kumrat is covered with green pastures, snow clad mountains, the river Panjkora, foggy mounds and forests are attractions of the region, which serve as habitats for variety of flora and fauna.

Our next stop will be at Sharingal, and drive onward to Thal town. Kumrat and swat vallyes are connected via a high pass between Thal & Utror.

visit the historic Tall mosque and enjoy the beauty there.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 28: Kumrat Valley Excursion

Visit hike upper Kumrat valley by jeep and optional hike to katora lake and back.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 29: Badawi Pass Utror - Kandol Lake -Kalam

Drive over Badawai Pass to Gabral valley, visit Kandol lake and Utror. Evening drive to Kalam.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 30: Mahodand Lake Excursion

Excursion to Ushu valley and Mahodand Lake, enroute stopping at Matiltan and shifa water fall. Evening drive back to Kalam.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 31: Drive to Bahrain Miandam

Drive to Miandam enroute visiting Bahrain and Chail valley scenic areas.In the afternoon enjoy hill walking in upper Miandam Valley or just relax in the lawn of your hotel and enjoy the beautiful mountain scenery.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 32: Drive to Malam Jabba - Murghzar - Mingora

Drive to Malam Jabba, enroute visite Jahan abad Buddha. Afternoon drive back to Mingora and visit Murghzar and Swat Museum. Visit AramPura village for local shawal etc.

Drive: 5-6 hrs
Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing,
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 33: Shangla Pass - Besham - Shogran
Day 33:  Shangla Pass - Besham - Shogran

Today after breakfast drive to scenic Shangla Pass for a scenic view and down to Alpuri valley, a picturesque northern Pakistan valley towards north east. Drive further down to Behsam and onward to Mansehra.
From Mansehra we will drive towards beautiful Balakot and Kewai. From Kewai, we will ascend on side road to beautifual hill station Shogran. Shogran is a village situated on a green plateau in the Kaghan Valley, northern Pakistan at a height of 7,749 feet or 2,362 metres above sea level.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 34: Sari Paya Excursion and Drive to Naran

After breakfast leave for Sari Payi by jeep or by walk/horse.Siri and paye is 6 Kilimeters away from Shogran. Siri, Paye Lake is situated near Shogran in the Kaghan Valley in Pakistan. It is situated at the height of almost 3,000 m (10,000 feet). It is surrounded by Makra Peak, Malka Parbat, Moosa da Musalla and the mountains of Kashmir.After noon back to Shogran and drive down to Kewai and onward Naran Road passing through Jareed to Shino Trout hatchery. After visiting Trout hatchery we will continue our drive to Khanian and Kaghan. After a brief visit of Kaghan village we resume our journey to Naran, summer capital of Naran Kaghan valley.

Drive: 3-4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 35: Saiful Maluk Excrusion and Drive to Islamabad

Today we will take an hour jeep drive to famous lake Saiful muluk.Saiful Muluk is an alpine lake located at the northern end of the Kaghan Valley, at an altitude of 3,224 m (10,578 feet) above sea level it is amongst one of the highest lakes in Pakistan. There is also a similar named fictional story associated with the lake. Weather here is moderate during day time while the temperature drops to negative temperatures at night Here we may take boating, horse riding and trout fishing activity.
Afternoon drive down to Balakot. Aftter a brief stop at Balakot, drive onward to mansehra stopping at scenic points for photo ops and also in Manserha to visit Ashoka Rock Eddicts.

Mansehra Rock Edicts are fourteen edicts of the Mauryan emperor Ashoka, inscribed on rocks in Mansehra. The edicts are cut into three boulders and date back to 3rd century BC and they are written in the ancient Indic script of Gandhara culture, Kharosthi. The edicts mention aspects of Ashoka’s dharma. This site is World Heritage Sites tentative list. After Manserha rock edicts visit, we will drive to Islamabad.

Drive: 7-8 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 36: Visit Taxila - Rawalpindi - Islamabad

Afterward will start our journey towards Taxila,” The World Oldest Existing City”, 32 kilometers from Islamabad spanning a rich history from 516 B.C to 600 A.D. In the 6th century B.C, the Achaemenians of Persia made it the Gandharan capital. Alexander the Great paused here en route from Swat.
Situated strategically on a branch of the Silk Road, Taxila linked China to the West, Taxila reached its apogee between the 1st and 5th centuries. It is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia. The ruins of the four settlement sites at Taxila reveal the pattern of urban evolution on the Indian subcontinent through more than five centuries.
The Mauryan emperor Ashoka, a patron of Buddhism, built a university here in 2nd century B.C biggest of its time in the world, to which pilgrims and scholars came from all over Asia. It requires two days to explore this richest archaeological sites of Asia but we will spent one day to view its excellent museum houses one of the best collections of Gandharan Buddhist in the world. Most of the archaeological sites of Taxila (600 BC to 500 AD) are located around Taxila Museum. For over the thousand years, Taxila remained famous as a center of learning Gandhara art of Sculpture, architecture, education, and Buddhism in the days of Buddhist glory.
There are over 50 archaeological sites scattered in a radius of 30 kms around Taxila. Some of the most important sites are: Dhamarajika Stupa and Monastery (300 BC 200 AD), Bhir Mound (600-200 BC), Sirkap (200 BC 600 AD), Jandial Temple (c.250 BC) and Julian Monastery (200- 600 AD).
One of these sites, the Bihr mound, is associated with the historic event of the triumphant entry of Alexander the Great into Taxila. The archaeological sites of Saraikala, Bhir, Sirkap, and Sirsukh are collectively of unique importance in illustrating the evolution of urban settlement on the Indian subcontinent. The prehistoric mound of Saraikala represents the earliest settlement of Taxila, with evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age occupation. The Bhir mound is the earliest historic city of Taxila, and was probably founded in the 6th century BC by the Achaemenians. Its stone walls, house foundations, and winding streets represent the earliest forms of urbanization on the subcontinent. Bihr is also associated with Alexander the Great’s triumphant entry into Taxila in 326 BC.
Sirkap was a fortified city founded during the mid-2nd century BC. The many private houses, stupas, and temples were laid out on the Hellenistic grid system and show the strong Western classical influence on local architecture. The city was destroyed in the 1st century by the Kushans, a Central Asian tribe. To the north, excavations of the ruins of the Kushan city of Sirsukh have brought to light an irregular rectangle of walls in ashlar masonry, with rounded bastions. These walls attest to the early influence of Central Asian architectural forms on those of the subcontinent.
The Taxila serial site also includes Khanpur cave, which has produced stratified microlithic tools of the Mesolithic period, and a number of Buddhist monasteries and stupas of various periods. Buddhist monuments erected throughout the Taxila valley transformed it into a religious heartland and a destination for pilgrims from as far afield as Central Asia and China. Other Buddhist archaeological sites at Taxila include the Khader Mohra grouping, the Kalawan grouping, the Giri monasteries, the Kunala stupa and monastery, the Jandial complex, the Lalchack and the Badalpur stupa remains and monasteries, the Pipplian and the Bahalar stupa and remains.
After this we will visit Truck Art painting site for an insight of this living art in Pakistan and meet the artist at work there.
Pakistan’s ‘truck art’ is now quite a well-known ‘genre’ around the world. For long, it has been an homegrown art-form in South Asia, especially in Pakistan, where the whole idea of decorating trucks (also, lorries and even rickshaws) with complex floral patterns and poetic calligraphy, has evolved in the most radiant and innovative manner.
Our next stop would be Heritage(folk lore) Museum.
The Heritage Museum is the first state museum of ethnology in Pakistan which presents the history and living traditions of the people of Pakistan both from the mainstream and the remotest regions of the country.
The Lok Virsa Folk Heritage Museum offers an enchanting journey spanning from the neolithic cultures of South Asia to the present day folk heritage and traditions of Pakistan. One can traverse through several thousand years of history in the space of a walk through the extensive corridors of the museum.
The museum shows the evolution of culture and tradition through the ages, accounting for most of the cultural changes and influences along the way. Every gallery of the museum imparts the essence of a bygone era, replete with the traditions, costumes, jewelry and folklore, and ending with depictions of the present folk heritage of the four provinces of Pakistan. Passing through the gallery called ‘Pottery through the ages’ one sees ancient pottery from thousands of years ago, including artifacts such as cooking stoves and pots, pitchers, plates, and grain containers etc.
After museum our next stop would be Shah Faisal Mosque, which is a major tourist attraction, and is referred as a contemporary and influential feature of Islamic architecture. Combined the structure cover an area of 54,000 square ft, the mosque dominates the landscape of Islamabad.
It is located on an elevated area of land against a picturesque backdrop of the national park on the foothills of Margalla Hills, the westernmost foothills of the Himalayas. The largest mosque in Pakistan, the Faisal Mosque was the largest mosque in the world from 1986 until 1993.
The mosque features a contemporary design consisting of eight sides of concrete shell and is inspired by a Bedouin tent.
Construction of the mosque began in 1976 after a $120 million grant from Saudi King Faisal, whose name the mosque bears. The unconventional design by Turkish architect Vedat Dalokay was selected after an international competition. Without a typical dome, the mosque is shaped like a Bedouin tent, surrounded by four 260 feet (79 m) tall minarets. The design features eight-sided shell shaped sloping roofs forming a triangular worship hall which can hold 10,000 worshippers, while the surrounding porticoes and the courtyard up-to 200,000 more.
After Faisal Mosque, our next stop would be Pir Sohawa view point Islamabad , where we would have to retreat our evening and dinner.

Drive: 3-4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 37: Katas Raj Temple - Khewra Salt Mine - Rohtas Fort -Lahore

After breakfast, we will start our journey towards Taxila,” The World Oldest Existing City”, 32 kilometers from Islamabad spanning a rich history from 516 B.C to 600 A.D. In the 6th century B.C, the Achaemenians of Persia made it the Gandharan capital. Alexander the Great paused here en route from Swat.
Situated strategically on a branch of the Silk Road, Taxila linked China to the West, Taxila reached its apogee between the 1st and 5th centuries. It is now one of the most important archaeological sites in Asia. The ruins of the four settlement sites at Taxila reveal the pattern of urban evolution on the Indian subcontinent through more than five centuries.
The Mauryan emperor Ashoka, a patron of Buddhism, built a university here in 2nd century B.C biggest of its time in the world, to which pilgrims and scholars came from all over Asia. It requires two days to explore this richest archaeological sites of Asia but we will spent one day to view its excellent museum houses one of the best collections of Gandharan Buddhist in the world. Most of the archaeological sites of Taxila (600 BC to 500 AD) are located around Taxila Museum. For over the thousand years, Taxila remained famous as a center of learning Gandhara art of Sculpture, architecture, education, and Buddhism in the days of Buddhist glory.
There are over 50 archaeological sites scattered in a radius of 30 kms around Taxila. Some of the most important sites are: Dhamarajika Stupa and Monastery (300 BC 200 AD), Bhir Mound (600-200 BC), Sirkap (200 BC 600 AD), Jandial Temple (c.250 BC) and Julian Monastery (200- 600 AD).
One of these sites, the Bihr mound, is associated with the historic event of the triumphant entry of Alexander the Great into Taxila. The archaeological sites of Saraikala, Bhir, Sirkap, and Sirsukh are collectively of unique importance in illustrating the evolution of urban settlement on the Indian subcontinent. The prehistoric mound of Saraikala represents the earliest settlement of Taxila, with evidence of Neolithic, Bronze Age, and Iron Age occupation. The Bhir mound is the earliest historic city of Taxila, and was probably founded in the 6th century BC by the Achaemenians. Its stone walls, house foundations, and winding streets represent the earliest forms of urbanization on the subcontinent. Bihr is also associated with Alexander the Great’s triumphant entry into Taxila in 326 BC.
Sirkap was a fortified city founded during the mid-2nd century BC. The many private houses, stupas, and temples were laid out on the Hellenistic grid system and show the strong Western classical influence on local architecture. The city was destroyed in the 1st century by the Kushans, a Central Asian tribe. To the north, excavations of the ruins of the Kushan city of Sirsukh have brought to light an irregular rectangle of walls in ashlar masonry, with rounded bastions. These walls attest to the early influence of Central Asian architectural forms on those of the subcontinent.
The Taxila serial site also includes Khanpur cave, which has produced stratified microlithic tools of the Mesolithic period, and a number of Buddhist monasteries and stupas of various periods. Buddhist monuments erected throughout the Taxila valley transformed it into a religious heartland and a destination for pilgrims from as far afield as Central Asia and China. Other Buddhist archaeological sites at Taxila include the Khader Mohra grouping, the Kalawan grouping, the Giri monasteries, the Kunala stupa and monastery, the Jandial complex, the Lalchack and the Badalpur stupa remains and monasteries, the Pipplian and the Bahalar stupa and remains.
Evening drive back to Islamabad.

Drive: 3-4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 38: Lahore

After Breakfast we will go to Jahangir’s Tomb across the River Ravi ‘s bridge.
The Tomb was built by his son Shah Jahan , of Taj Mahal fame in 1627. A 180 room hotel Akbari Serai was also built here by Shah Jahan in 1637 around spacious garden. The Tomb of Asif Khan father of Mumtaz Mahal is also here , the lady for whom the Taj Mahal was built in Agra.
Lahore is considered the cultural capital of Pakistan because of its numerous colleges, places of learning, sports activities frequent stage plays etc.
We will now move to impressive Shalimar Garden built by Shah Jahan in 1642 for the royal household, it follows the Moghul concept of the perfect walled garden with geometrically arranged ponds, fountains and marble pavilions, surrounded by flowers and fruit trees.
Shalimar Garden ‘s Construction began in 1637 C.E. during the reign of Emperor Shah Jahan and was completed in 1641.
The Shalimar Gardens were laid out as a Persian paradise garden. The gardens measure 658 metres by 258 metres, and cover an area of 16 hectares east of Lahore’s Walled City. The gardens are enclosed by a brick wall that is famous for its intricate fretwork.
In 1981 the Shalimar Gardens were inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site as they embody Mughal garden design at the apogee of its development. The gardens date from the period when the Mughal Empire was at its artistic and aesthetic zenith.
The gardens have been laid out from south to north in three levels of terraces, with levels spaced by 4–5 metres (13-15 feet) above the other, descending from south to north. The respective names of the three terraces have been listed as follows:
The middle level terrace of the garden, known as the Faiz Bakhsh terrace
The upper level or the third terrace named Farah Baksh meaning Bestower of Pleasure
The middle level or the second terrace named Faiz Baksh meaning Bestower of Goodness
The lower level terrace named Hayat Baksh meaning Bestower of Life
Architecture of Shalimar Garden
Shalimar Gardens draws inspiration from Central Asia, Kashmir, Punjab, Persia and the Delhi Sultanate. The Shalimar Gardens are laid out in the form of an oblong parallelogram, surrounded by a high brick wall, which is famous for its intricate fretwork. This garden was made on the concept of a Persian paradise garden. The gardens measure 658 meters north to south and 258 meters east to west.
Fountains
From this basin, and from the canal, rise 410 fountains, which discharge into wide marble pools. It is a credit to the creativity of Mughal engineers that even today scientists are unable to fully comprehend the water systems and thermal engineering from architectural blueprints. The surrounding area is rendered cooler by the flowing of the fountains, which is a particular relief for visitors during Lahore’s blistering summers, with temperature sometimes exceeding 120 °F (49 °C). The distribution of the fountains is as follows:
The upper level terrace has 105 fountains.
The middle level terrace has 152 fountains.
The lower level terrace has 153 fountains.
All combined, the Gardens has 410 fountains.
The Gardens have 5 water cascades including the great marble cascade and Sawan Bhadoon.
Later afternoon we will go to watch the Wahgah border flag lowering ceremony. The lowering of the flags ceremony at the Wagah border is a military practice, every evening before sunset at the Wagah border, which as part of the Grand Trunk Road was the only road link between these two countries before the opening of the Aman Setu in Kashmir in 1999.
The spectacle of the ceremony attracts many visitors from both sides of the border, as well as international tourists.
The drill is characterized by elaborate and rapid dance-like maneuvers. It is alternatively a symbol of the two countries’ rivalry, as well as brotherhood and cooperation between the two nations.
The ceremony starts with a blustering parade by the soldiers from both the sides, and ends up in the perfectly coordinated lowering of the two nations’ flags. It is called the “beating retreat” border ceremony on the international level. One infantryman stands at attention on each side of the gate. As the sun sets, the iron gates at the border are opened and the two flags are lowered simultaneously.
The flags are folded and the ceremony ends with a retreat that involves a brusque handshake between soldiers from either side, followed by the closing of the gates again.
The soldiers of this ceremony are specially appointed and trained for this auspicious ceremony. Also they have additional beard and moustache policy in which they are paid additionally for it.
After the ceremony we will drive back to Lahore for dinner and back to hotel.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 39: Lahore

Today morning after breakfast at hotel we will move out on The Mall Road, which was a modern thoroughfare lined with exquisite buildings of great public and private utility during British time.
We will stop over at Gymkhana Club or Little Britain opposite Lawrence Gardens to take a view of this symbol of prestige and a favorite haunt of men of diverse talents and fortune. The halls of club were built in memory of two Governors Sir John Lawrence and Sir Robert Montgomery.
We will move to The Lahore Museum built by the British in Moghul Gothic style and opened in 1894.John Lockwood Kipling, Rudyard’s father was the museum’s first curator. It is the best museum in Pakistan with a superb collection of Moghal period includes illustrated manuscripts, miniatures, rugs and carvings. It also has excellent galleries of pre historic Pakistan and a superb collection of Buddhist stone sculpture. The famous Zam – Zama gun casted in 1760 stand in front of the Museum.
From here we move to Royal Palace of Lahore Fort which rank in size and beauty with the Moghul forts at Delhi and Agra. Akbar began building it the 1560s on the site of an older fort. The fortress is located at the northern end of Lahore’s Walled City, and spreads over an area greater than 20 hectares. It contains 21 notable monuments, some of which date to the era of Emperor Akbar. The Lahore Fort is notable for having been almost entirely rebuilt in the 17th century, when the Mughal Empire was at the height of its splendour and opulence.
Though the site of the Lahore Fort has been inhabited for millennia, the first record of a fortified structure at the site was in regard to an 11th-century mud-brick fort.
The foundations of the modern Lahore Fort date to 1566 during the reign of Emperor Akbar, who bestowed the fort with an architectural style that featured Hindu motifs.
Additions from the Shah Jahan period are characterized by luxurious marble with inlaid Persian floral designs, while the fort’s grand and iconic Alamgiri Gate was constructed by the last of the great Mughal Emperors, Aurangzeb, and faces the renowned Badshahi Mosque.
After the fall of the Mughal Empire, the Lahore Fort was used as the residence of Ranjit Singh, founder of the Sikh Empire. The fort then passed to British colonialists after they annexed Punjab following their victory over the Sikhs at the Battle of Gujrat in February 1849.
In 1981, the fort was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site for its outstanding repertoire of Mughal monuments dating from the era when the empire was at its artistic and aesthetic zenith.
From here we walk to Badshahi Mosque built by Emperor Aurangzeb in 1674 after the mosques of Delhi and Agra. It consists of a huge square with a minaret at each corner. You can climb up the 204 steps to the top of one of the minarets for a bird’s eye view of the old city of Lahore.
We will move for lunch to a local restaurant and enjoy the best local taste known the world over as Tanduri.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 40: Harappa - Multan

Today after breakfast drive to Multan with an en-route stop to visit Harrappa. Harrappa located about 200km (124 miles) from Lahore and about 30 km (19 miles) from Sahiwal, is the site of an ancient and important settlement of the prehistoric Indus Valley Civilization (3rd to 2nd millennium B.C.) and stands witness to the 5000 years old cultural continuity of civilization in Pakistan.
Harrappa was the cradle of one of the earliest civilization known to man and conjures up images of fifty centuries ago, a period about which very little is knwon.An interesting and well maintained museum at the Harrappa site houses artifacts found in the area.
The site of the ancient city contains the ruins of a Bronze Age fortified city, which was part of the Cemetery H culture and the Indus Valley Civilization, centered in Sindh and the Punjab. The city is believed to have had as many as 23,500 residents and occupied about 150 hectares (370 acres) with clay sculptured houses at its greatest extent during the Mature Harappan phase (2600–1900 BC), which is considered large for its time. Per archaeological convention of naming a previously unknown civilization by its first excavated site, the Indus Valley Civilization is also called the Harappan Civilization.
The two greatest cities, Mohenjo-daro and Harappa, emerged circa 2600 BCE along the Indus River valley in Punjab and Sindh.The civilization, with a possible writing system, urban centers, and diversified social and economic system, was rediscovered in the 1920s after excavations at Mohenjo-daro in Sindh near Larkana, and Harappa, in west Punjab south of Lahore.
A number of other sites stretching from the Himalayan foothills in east Punjab, India in the north, to Gujarat in the south and east, and to Pakistani Balochistan in the west have also been discovered and studied. Although the archaeological site at Harappa was damaged in 1857, when engineers constructing the Lahore-Multan railroad (as part of the Sindh and Punjab Railway), used brick from the Harappa ruins for track ballast, an abundance of artifacts has nevertheless been found.
The bricks discovered were made of red sand, clay, stones and were baked at very high temperature. As early as 1826 Harappa located in west Punjab attracted the attention of a British officer in India, gets credit for preliminary excavations in Harappa. The excavators of the site have proposed the following chronology of Harappa’s occupation:
Ravi Aspect of the Hakra phase, c. 3300 – 2800 BC.
Kot Dijian (Early Harappan) phase, c. 2800 – 2600 BC.
Harappan Phase, c. 2600 – 1900 BC.
Transitional Phase, c. 1900 – 1800 BC.
Late Harappan Phase, c. 1800 – 1300 BC.
By far the most exquisite and obscure artifacts unearthed to date are the small, square steatite (soapstone) seals engraved with human or animal motifs. A large number of seals have been found at such sites as Mohenjo-Daro and Harappa. Many bear pictographic inscriptions generally thought to be a form of writing or script. Evening drive to Multan.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 41: Multan

In the morning we will visit mystic shrines of sufi saints of Multan.
Multan’s history stretches back into antiquity. The ancient city was site of the renowned Multan Sun Temple, and was besieged by Alexander the Great during the Mallian Campaign. Multan was one of the most important trading centres of medieval Islamic India, and attracted a multitude of Sufi mystics in the 11th and 12th centuries, earning the city the nickname City of Saints. The city, along with the nearby city of Uch, is renowned for its large collection of Sufi shrines dating from that era.
Afternoon city tour of Multan that commences with visit to Old Fort, which is an eloquent example of the proud history of this city.
Among the attractions inside the fort are the elaborately decorated shrines of Sheikh Bahad-ud-din Zakriya, Shah Shams Tabriz and Shah Rukn-e-Alam. Damdama, the highest point in the fort, provides a bird’s-eye panoramic view of the city, which has survived the destruction of invaders since Alexander the Great in the 4th century B.C.
We will also visit Prahladpuri Temple, adjacent to tomb of Hazrat Baha’ul Haq Zakariya. The Prahladapuri temple like the Sun Temple of Multan had been destroyed after Muslim conquest of Multan, suffered several material losses and was reduced to a nondescript shrine by the 19th century. A mosque has subsequently built adjacent to temple.
The original temple of Prahladpuri is said to have been built by Prahlad, son of Hiranyakashipu, the king of Multan (Kashya-papura)in honor of Narsing Avatar, an incarnation of Hindu god Vishnu, who emerged from the pillar to save Prahlada.
Other tombs of interest are.
Shah Yousaf Gardezi (d. 1136), tomb located inner Bohar Gate Multan
Mai Maharban (11/12th Century), tomb located near Chowk Fawara, children complex Multan
Bahauddin Zikarya (1170–1267), tomb located in Multan Fort
Shah Rukne Alam (1251–1335), tomb located in Multan Fort
Khawaja Awais Kagha (d. 1300)3, tomb located in Dera Basti graveyard Multan
Among the other places to visit are Eidgah Mosque and Hussain Agahi Bazaar for blue pottery , camel skin work and clay pottery craftsmanship at work.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 42: Bahawalpur

After breakfast we will drive to Bahawal pur to visit few land marks of Bahawalpur, also lies near the ancient Derawar Fort in the Cholistan Desert near the border with India, and serves as the gateway to Pakistan’s Lal Suhanra National Park.
Bahawalpur was once the capital of the former princely state of Bahawalpur ruled by Nawabs. The Nawabs of Bahawalpur were regarded as part of the Rajputana States, the majority of which now form the bulk of the neighbouring Indian state of Rajasthan. The Nawabs bestowed Bahawalpur with several monuments, such as the palaces of Noor Mahal, Sadiq Ghar Palace, and Darbar Mahal. Which include Royal Palaces of Noor Mahal, Darbar Mahal, Gulzar Mahal and Nishat Mahal.
We will pass through Fareed Gate to visit Abbasi Mosque and Jamia Masjid Al Sadiq.
After visit of Bahawalpur Museum and visit of Handicraft bazar / market we will settle in to hotel.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 43: Derawar Fort & Mosque - Mausoleums - Uch Sharif - Sadiqabad

Today we will make an excursion to Derawar Fort, an impressive building in the heart of Cholistan Desert.
Derawar Fort is a large square fortress, with forty bastions of Derawar are visible for many miles in the Cholistan Desert. The walls have a perimeter of 1500 metres and stand up to thirty metres high.
Derawar fort was built by Rai Jajja Bhatti, a Rajput ruler of the Bhatti clan. The fort was built in the 9th century AD as a tribute to Rawal Deoraj Bhatti, a Rajput sovereign king of the Jaisalmer and Bahawalpur areas who had his capital at Lodhruva.The fort was initially known as Dera Rawal, and later referred to as Dera Rawar, which with the passage of time came to be pronounced Derawar, its present name.
In the 18th century, the fort was taken over by Muslim Nawabs of Bahawalpur from the Shahotra tribe. It was later renovated by Abbasi rulers, but in 1747 the fort slipped from their hands owing to Bahawal Khan’s preoccupations at Shikarpur. Nawab Mubarak Khan took the stronghold back in 1804. 1,000 year-old catapult shells were found in the debris near a decaying wall in the fort.
At Derawar, we will visit the unique Derawar Mosque made by white marble in contrast to the desert all around.
Afterward we will visit Uch Sharif.
Uch is an important historical city, having been founded by Alexander the Great. Formerly located at the confluence of the Indus and Chenab rivers, it is now 100 kilometres (62 mi) from that confluence, which has moved to Mithankot. It is believed that in 325 BC Alexander the Great founded a city called Alexandria on the Indus at the site of the last confluence of Punjab rivers with the Indus.
Nevertheless, some historians believe that Uch predates the advent of Bikramjit when Jains and Buddhists ruled over the area, and that Mithankot or Chacharan Sharif was the true settlement of Alexandria. In AD 712, Muhammad bin Qasim conquered the city and during the Muslim period Uch was one of the centres of Islamic studies of South Asia.
There are several tombs of famous mystics (Sufis) in Uch, notably the tombs of Syed Jalaluddin Bukhari and his family. These structures were joined by a series of domed tombs; the first is said to have been built for Baha’al-Halim by his pupil, the Suharwardiya Sufi saint Jahaniyan Jahangasht (1307–1383), the second for the latter’s great-granddaughter, Bibi Jawindi, in 1494, and the third for the latter’s architect. which are considered masterpieces of Islamic architecture and are on the UNESCO World Heritage Site tentative list.
In the evening we will drive to Sadiqabad.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with javascript:void(0);locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 44: Bhong Mosque - Sukkur

After breakfast visit Bhong. On the way we will stop at Bhong, which boasts an extraordinary modern mosque started in the 1960s and winner of the Aga Khan Award for Architecture.
It is built in traditional style with extravagant use of gold leaf, mirror work and onyx; it is particularly famous for its stylized Arabic calligraphy. A rich merchant Rais Ghazi sponsors the mosque. Muslim shrines and a river island having a Hindu temple are of particular interest for locals and visitors alike.
After visit of Bhong, we drive to Sukkur Sindh. The Sukkur Barrage has 66 Gates. The Sukkur Barrage (formally called Lloyd Barrage), built under the British Raj on the Indus River, controls one of the largest irrigation systems in the world. It was designed by Sir Arnold Musto KCIE, and constructed under the overall direction of Sir Charlton Harrison, KCIE, as Chief Engineer. Construction of the barrage was started in 1923 and completed in January 1932. The 5,001 feet (1,524 m) long barrage is made of yellow stone and steel and can water nearly 10 million acres (40,000 km2) of farmland through its seven large canals. Some of the canals are larger than the Suez Canal.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 45: Kot Diji- Fort - Khair Pur

Today in the morning we will make an excursion to Kot Diji. The ancient site at Kot Diji was the forerunner of the Indus Civilization.
The occupation of this site is attested already at 3300 BCE. The remains consist of two parts; the citadel area on high ground (about 12 m), and outer area. The site covers 2.6 ha. The earliest occupation of this site is termed ‘Kot Dijian’, which is pre-Harappan, or early formative Harappan.
At the earliest layer, Kot Diji I (2605 BC), copper and bronze were not used. The houses and fortifications were made from unbaked mud-bricks. Lithic material, such as leaf-shaped chert arrowheads, shows parallels with Mundigak layers II-IV. The pottery seems to anticipate Harappan Ware. Later, bronze was used, but only for personal ornaments. Also, potters wheel was already used.
The Early Harappan phase consists of two clearly defined areas. Citadel on high ground for the elites separated by a defensive wall with bastions at regular intervals. This area measures about 500 ft x 350 ft.Outer area, or the city proper consisted of houses of mud bricks on stone foundations.
Pottery found from this site have design with horizontal and wavy lines, or loops and simple triangular patterns. Other objects found are pots, pans, storage jars, toy carts, balls, bangles, beads, terracotta figurines of mother goddess and animals, bronze arrowheads. Well fashioned stone implements were also discovered.The interesting find at Kot Diji is a toy cart, which shows that potter’s wheel lead to wheels for bullock carts.
Kot Diji Fort which is a magnificent early 19th century fort built by Talpurs, the former rulers of Sindh from 1789 to 1843. It is a well preserved fort perched on the ridge of a steep narrow hill and is an interesting place to visit. The fort sits atop a 110 foot tall high hill that rises above the city of Kot Diji. The fort’s 30 foot tall walls encircle the uppermost portion of the fort, resulting a narrow-width fortress with perimeter of 1.8 kilometers. The fort contains three strategically placed towers that are each 50 feet tall.
The fort contains several sites for cannon placement, and contains numerous inner passages for protection. The fort also contains a water reservoir, ammunition storage, prison, courtroom, numerous cells for security personnel, and a small regal residence.
In the afternoon we will visit Faiz Mahal, which was built in Khairpur Mirs in 1798 as the principal building serving as the sovereign’s court for the royal palace complex of Talpur monarchs of the Khairpur dynasty. Originally it included the ruler’s chambers along with 16 waiting rooms for courtiers and guest rooms for royal guests along side the durbar and dining halls. Additionally there was the Hathi Khana for the royal elephant and the horses stables where today there is a mango orchard.
Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 46: Mohenjo daro- Larkana

After breakfast drive to Moenjodaro.The archeological ruins of Moenjodaro are situated on the western bank of the river Indus, in Larkana district.
Built around 2500 BCE, it was one of the largest settlements of the ancient Indus Valley civilization, and one of the world’s earliest major urban settlements, contemporaneous with the civilizations of ancient Egypt, Mesopotamia, Minoan Crete, and Norte Chico.
Mohenjo-daro was abandoned in the 19th century BCE as the Indus Valley Civilization declined, and the site was not rediscovered until the 1920s. Significant excavation has since been conducted at the site of the city, which was designated an UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1980.
From the articles discovered here it is believed that the Iron Age had not yet dawned on the Indus Valley civilization. The vessels discovered are of lead, silver, copper or bronze, whereas the weapons are made only of bronze. The museum displays interesting relics found during excavation, such as engraved seals, utensils, ornaments, weapons, sculpture, and pottery.
Mohenjo-daro has a planned layout based on a street grid of rectilinear buildings. Most were built of fired and mortared brick; some incorporated sun-dried mud-brick and wooden superstructures. The covered area of Mohenjo-daro is estimated at 300 hectares.[16] The Oxford Handbook of Cities in World History offers a “weak” estimate of a peak population of around 40,000.
The sheer size of the city, and its provision of public buildings and facilities, suggests a high level of social organization. The city is divided into two parts, the so-called Citadel and the Lower City. The Citadel – a mud-brick mound around 12 metres (39 ft) high – is known to have supported public baths, a large residential structure designed to house about 5,000 citizens, and two large assembly halls.
The city had a central marketplace, with a large central well. Individual households or groups of households obtained their water from smaller wells. Waste water was channeled to covered drains that lined the major streets. Some houses, presumably those of more prestigious inhabitants, include rooms that appear to have been set aside for bathing, and one building had an underground furnace (known as a hypocaust), possibly for heated bathing. Most houses had inner courtyards, with doors that opened onto side-lanes. Some buildings had two stories.
In 1950, Sir Mortimer Wheeler identified one large building in Mohenjo-daro as a “Great Granary”. Certain wall-divisions in its massive wooden superstructure appeared to be grain storage-bays, complete with air-ducts to dry the grain. According to Wheeler, carts would have brought grain from the countryside and unloaded them directly into the bays. However, Jonathan Mark Kenoyer noted the complete lack of evidence for grain at the “granary”, which, he argued, might therefore be better termed a “Great Hall” of uncertain function. Close to the “Great Granary” is a large and elaborate public bath, sometimes called the Great Bath. From a colonnaded courtyard, steps lead down to the brick-built pool, which was waterproofed by a lining of bitumen. The pool measures 12 metres (39 ft) long, 7 metres (23 ft) wide and 2.4 metres (7.9 ft) deep. It may have been used for religious purification.
Other large buildings include a “Pillared Hall”, thought to be an assembly hall of some kind, and the so-called “College Hall”, a complex of buildings comprising 78 rooms, thought to have been a priestly residence.
Mohenjo-daro had no series of city walls, but was fortified with guard towers to the west of the main settlement, and defensive fortifications to the south. Considering these fortifications and the structure of other major Indus valley cities like Harappa, it is postulated that Mohenjo-daro was an administrative center.
Both Harappa and Mohenjo-daro share relatively the same architectural layout, and were generally not heavily fortified like other Indus Valley sites. It is obvious from the identical city layouts of all Indus sites that there was some kind of political or administrative centrality, but the extent and functioning of an administrative center remains unclear.
Mohenjo-daro was successively destroyed and rebuilt at least seven times. Each time, the new cities were built directly on top of the old ones. Flooding by the Indus is thought to have been the cause of destruction
Once the tour is finished in Moenjo daro, we will resume our journey to Larkana.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 47: Sehwan - Hyderabad

Today in the morning we will drive to Sehwan and onward to Hyderabad. At Sehwan we will visit the shrine of great Hazrat Lal Shahbaz Qalandar, a famous Muslim Sufi Saint of 10th century.
The shrine was built in 1356, but was subsequently upgraded. The completed portions are now extensively covered in white marble, glazed tiles, and mirror work. The shrine’s gold-plated main door was donated by the last Shah of Iran, Mohammad Reza Pahlavi, in the 1970sThe saint’s tomb is located under the shrine’s central dome, with some illumination provided by small earthen oil lamps similar to those used in Hindu ceremonies.
The main attraction of shrine is Dhamal (sufi’s dance) with folk music and colorful dress and this dhamal is at its full swing during the annual urs (death ceremony), when his devotees from all around Pakistan get gathered here. After visit to Sehwan, we will go to Mohanas Boat villages and then onward to Hyderabad.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 48: Ranikot Fort, Pakka Qilla

After breakfast we will visit Ranikot Fort, which is also known as The Great Wall of Sindh and is believed to be among one of the world’s largest fortswith a circumference of approximately 26 kilometres (16 mi). Kumbhalgarh Fort, a World Heritage Site as part of the Hill Forts of Rajasthan, with over 38 km long wall has the second longest wall in the world after the Great Wall of China.
The fort has been compared to the Great Wall of china. The original purpose and architects of Ranikot Fort are unknown. However, it is believed that the fort was built during the regimes of the Sassanians, the Scythians, the Parthians or the Bactrian Greeks.
Archaeologists point to the 17th century as the time of its first construction but Sindh archaeologists now agree that some of the present structures were reconstructed by Talpurs in 1812 at a cost of 1.2 million rupees (Sindh Gazetteer, 677). The battlements of Ranikot formed the last capital of the Amirs of Sind, when they were brought under the colonial rule of the British Empire.
The fort is huge, connecting several bleak mountains of the Kirthar hills along contours, and measures 31 kilometres (19 mi) in length. The fort is interspersed with several bastions in between and three[clarification needed] are of semi-circular shape.
The northern part of the fort’s perimeter is a natural high hilly formation while on the other three sides it is covered by fort walls. Within this main fort there is a smaller fort known as the “Meeri” which is about 5–6 miles from the entry gate of the main fort, and is reported to have served as the palace of the Mir royal family. The entire fort structure has been built with stone and lime mortar. The fort is built in a zig-zag form, with four entry gates in the shape of a rhomboid. Two of the gates, facing each are crossed diagonally by the Sann river; the first gate is on the western side and is skirted by the river water and is difficult to approach.
The southern entry gate has a double doors gate. Within the gates there are two niches which have floral ornamentation and carved stones. The Sann gate is well preserved and can be climbed to reach the top of the fort from both sides to get a scenic view of the terrain around the fort.
Later on we will visit pacco Qillo fort in Hyderabad, which was constructed on the hillock known locally as Gunjy, by Mian Ghulam Shah Kalhoro, around 1768 when he founded the city of Hyderabad.
Located right in the centre of Hyderabad, Sindh, are the remains of a fort. Only a part of the ruined majesty remains now. The walls of the fortress are built of brick and stone, and are of immense thickness; it is about half a mile square and contains nearly 1800 dwelling houses; some of them are the palaces of the Ameers of Scinde; in its interior there is also a very lofty tower mounted by seventy-six steps to the top, in which are placed four large pieces of ordnance, 84-pounders, of Persian manufacture.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture, Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 49: Bhit shah Excursion

Today we will make a full day excursion to Bhit Shah & Hala.
Bhit Shah is famous for the shrine of Shah Abdul Latif, one of the most famous Sufi poets of Indian sub-continent during 18th century. Situated about 50 Kms from Hyderabad, the shrine of Shah Abdul Latif is the hub of devotional activities including the singing, folk music and dancing by his devotees from all the corners of Sindh.
He is remembered for the compendium of his poetry called ‘Risalo’, a treasure house of wisdom as well as romantic folklore and fine pottery. He also founded a musical tradition of his own which is still popular. Devotees sing with fervor and frenzy his love-intoxicated Kafis to the strains of yak-tara (single string instrument) mainly on the occasion of his “Urs” held every year between 13th and 15th of Saffar, the second Islamic lunar month.
Situated at another 05 Kms from Bhit Shah is Hala, which is the most famous handicraft center of Sindh as well as Pakistan. The New city of Hala is located about 03 Kms from banks of River Indus as the old city was destroyed during the disastrous flood. Even today the potters in Hala produce the best of blue lined white ceramics besides the other specialties of Hala, which include pottery vases, birds & tiles, lacquer work chairs, beds and cots and wood carvings.
We will also visit the Mausoleum of famous Muslim Saint, Makhdoom Nooh. The facade of his mausoleum is covered by some of Hala’s best blue and white tile work in floral and geometric designs. Later we drive back to Hyderabad.

Drive: 5-6 hrs

Activities: History & Culture , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 50: Thatta - Makli Necropolis - Bhanbore - Chaukandi - Karachi

After breakfast drive to Thatta.
Thatta is an ancient town with an interesting history dating back to the time of the Macedonian, Alexander the Great, who used the port to rest his weary troops. The present Thatta was founded in the 15th century. Under the Mughals it was a provincial capital and during this period there were as many as 400 institutions of learning in the city.
Some outstanding architecture left from the Mughal period remains in the religious and historical monuments. Thatta is famous for its necropolis, which covers 10 km2 (3.9 sq mi) on the Makli Hill, which assumed its quasi-sacred character during Jam Nizamu-d Din’s rule. The site became closely interlinked with the lives of the people. Every year thousands perform pilgrimage to this site to commemorate the saints buried here. The graves testify to a period of four centuries when Thatta was a thriving center of trade, religion and scholarly pursuits and the capital of Sind.
Then we will visit Shah Jahan Mosque in Thatta.
The Shah Jahan Mosque was built during the reign of Mughal emperor Shah Jahan. He made it as a gift for the kind and warm hospitality of the people of Thatta.
It is unique in this way that it contains no minarets but has a total of a staggering, 100 domes, the highest for any structure in Pakistan. Unlike other Mughal-era structures, it also does not contain pink sandstone.
It was made using materials from areas of Sunday such as Hala (where the bricks were imported from). The mosque was built with acoustics in mind: a person speaking on one end of the dome can be heard from the other end when the speech exceeds 100 decibels.
Then we will visit to Makli Necropolis which is Located near the apex of the delta of the Indus River. It is an enormous cemetery, possessing approximately 500,000 to 1 million tombs built over the course of a 400 year period, in an area of about 10 square kilometres. Massed at the edge of the 6.5 kilometre long plateau of Makli Hill, the necropolis of Makli – which was associated with the nearby city of Thatta, once a capital and centre of Islamic culture, – testifies in an outstanding manner to the civilizations of Sindh from the 14th to the 18th centuries. The vast necropolis of Makli is among the largest in the world. Kings, queens, governors, saints, scholars, and philosophers are all buried here in brick or stone monuments, some of which are lavishly decorated with glazed tiles. The unique assemblage of massive structures presents an impressive order of monumental buildings in different architectural styles. These structures are notable for their fusion of diverse influences into a local style. The historical monuments at the necropolis of Makli stand as eloquent testimonies to the social and political history of the Sindh. The site was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1981 as an "outstanding testament" to Sindhi civilization between the 14th and 18th centuries.
The site became closely interlinked with the lives of the people. Every year thousands perform pilgrimage to this site to commemorate the saints buried here. The graves testify to a period of four centuries when Thatta was a thriving center of trade, religion and scholarly pursuits and the capital of Sind.
After it drive to Bahnbore.
Bhambore is the ruins of the ancient port city of Debal from the 7th century, located near Karachi, Sindh, Pakistan, at the base of the Indus River. . Its population was mainly Hindu with a Buddhist minority. It is largely known for the ruins of a castle destroyed by Muhammad bin Qasim during the invasion of Sindh and—on a different note—the legendary love story of Sassi Punnun. The ruins are located approximately 60 km between Dhabeji and Gharo.
Banbhore is an ancient city dating to the 1st century BC, It dates back to the Scytho-Parthian era and was later controlled by Muslims from 8th to 13th century after which it was abandoned. Remains of one of the earliest known mosques in the region dating back to 727 AD are still preserved in the city.
Archaeological records reveal remnants of three distinct periods on the site; Scytho-Parthian (1st century BC to 2nd century AD), Hindu-Buddhist (2nd century AD to 8th century AD), and early Islamic (8th century AD to 13th century AD).
Archaeological findings show that the city consisted of an enclosed area surrounded by a stone and mud wall. The citadel was divided into eastern and western sections by a fortified stone wall in the center. The eastern part contains ruins of a mosque with an inscription dating to 727 AD, sixteen years after the conquest of Sindh, indicating the best preserved example of the earliest mosques in the region. The remains of the mosque were discovered in 1960. Remains of houses, streets, and other buildings have been found both within and outside the citadel.
Contemporary stone buildings from the three periods are also uncovered in the area including a palatial stone building with semi-circular shape, a Shiva temple from the Hindu period, and a mosque. Three gateways to the citadel were also uncovered during excavations.
Then we will visit Thatta.
Thatta is an ancient town with an interesting history dating back to the time of the Macedonian, Alexander the Great, who used the port to rest his weary troops. The present Thatta was founded in the 15th century. Under the Mughals it was a provincial capital and during this period there were as many as 400 institutions of learning in the city.
After Bahnbore drive to drive to chaukandi.
Chaukandi tombs form an early Islamic cemetery .The tombs are remarkable for their elaborate sandstone carvings. The style of architecture is typical to the region of Sindh. Generally, the tombs are attributed to the Jokhio and known as the family graveyard of the Jokhio tribe, although other, mainly Baloch, tribes have also been buried here. They were mainly built during Mughal rule sometime in the 15th and 18th centuries when Islam became dominant.
This type of graveyard in Sindh and Balochistan is remarkable because of its main north-south orientation. The more elaborate graves are constructed with a buff-colored sandstone. Their carved decoration displays expert craftsmanship and has often kept remarkably well over time. The tombs are embellished with geometrical designs and motifs, including figural representations such as mounted horsemen, hunting scenes, arms, and jewelry.
Tombs were constructed either as single graves or as groups of up to eight graves, raised on a common platform. A typical sarcophagus consists of six vertical slabs, with two long slabs on each side of the grave indicating the length of the body and the remaining two vertical slabs on the head and foot side. These six slabs are covered by a second sarcophagus consisting of six more similar vertical slabs but smaller in size, giving the grave a pyramid shape. The upper box is further covered with four or five horizontal slabs and the topmost construction is set vertically with its northern end often carved into a knob known as a crown or a turban.
Later resume drive to Karachi.

Drive: 3-4 hrs

Activities: History & Culture , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Day 51: Karachi - Fly out

After breakfast sight seeing of Karachi city starts.
The Mausoleum of Quaid-e-Azam is one of the most recognizable sights in Karachi. It was built in honor of Mohammad Ali Jinnah, founder of Pakistan, set at the top of a stepped pyramid in a small park. Built in 1958-68 from the design of a Turkish architect. The tomb itself is guarded at all times, and the ceremonial changing of the guard is an experience that is not to be missed.
After this we will visit Mohatta Palace.
It is the most famous and beautiful place in Karachi where people come and enjoy the attractive scenic views. The building is in pink color in combination of Jodhpur stone and local yellow stone of Gizri. The Mohatta Palace consists of museum where you will see the statues of some legends like Queen Victoria and Soldiers of Raj.
After lunch we will visit Frere Hall.
Frere Hall is a stunning building in the Victorian Gothic architecture style. It dates back to the 1800’s, when the area was under British rule. The surrounding gardens and grounds are the perfect setting for an afternoon stroll and will give you plenty of opportunities to take some great photographs of the historic building.
After this we will drive at the seaside, called Sea View to watch sunset. The area is most beautiful at sunrise and sunset. This area is home to many restaurants and shops to keep you entertained. During the evening on Saturdays and Sundays, one can view one of the tallest jet fountains in the world, right at Clifton Beach. There are boat tours that take you out to see the fountain up close.

Evening drive to airport for onward flight. End of Trip

Drive: 2-3 hrs

Activities: History & Culture , Sightseeing, Interaction with locals
Meals provided: Breakfast
Accommodation: Hotel

Included/Exclude

  • check-1 ACCOMMODATION:
  • check-1 Accommodation in 2-3 Star Hotel. The style of accommodation is a guideline. On rare occasions, alternative arrangements may need to be made due to the lack of availability of rooms in our usual accommodation. A similar standard of accommodation will be used in these instances.
  • check-1 TWIN SHARE / MULTI SHARE BASIS: Accommodation on this trip is on a twin share basis with ensuite bath (on request multi share basis). Please note there may be times in remote and far flung areas where facilities will be shared rather than ensuite and rare occasions when you share a room with passengers travelling on our different trips than your own. Some of the accommodation along the way is basic or simple, staying in local guesthouses and home stays. Some areas of Pakistan experience daily load shedding. This is where the power may be turned off at certain times of the day and usually occurs for a few hours. Most hotel properties have a restaurant or cafe serving local meals. All restaurants and hotels (except a few) do not serve alcohol for religious reasons or due to local laws.
  • check-1 SHOWERS: Showers at some hotels only have hot water at peak times (usually morning and evening). Outside of these times you may need to speak to reception to obtain hot water.
  • check-1 ROOM ISSUES: If you have any issues with your room, please speak to the hotel and your tour leader right away rather than your travel agent so that the problem can be addressed without delay.
  • check-1 CHECK-IN TIME: Throughout the trip we request that our hotels prepare rooms in time for our arrival, especially if we're arriving prior to normal check-in time. (In Pakistan, normal check-in is at 14:00 hrs, check-out is at 12:00 hrs). This may not be always possible to manage early check-in for you; in that case you won't be able to check-in immediately on arrival at some hotels. However this isn't always possible which means we won't be able to check-in immediately on arrival at some hotels. Instead, we can store our luggage and explore our new destination.
  • check-1 PRE/POST TRIP ACCOMMODATION: If you've purchased pre-trip or post-trip accommodation (if available), you may be required to change rooms from your trip accommodation for these extra nights.
  • check-1 SHOWERS: Showers at some hotels only have hot water at peak times (usually morning and evening). Outside of these times you may need to speak to reception to obtain hot water.
  • check-1 ROOM ISSUES: If you have any issues with your room, please speak to the hotel and your tour leader right away rather than your travel agent so that the problem can be addressed without delay.
  • check-1 • MEALS:
  • check-1 Daily breakfast at coffee shop or restaurant at the hotel.
  • check-1 This tour offers vegetarian and special food options on request. Simply let our Customer Support team know the food option that you prefer.
  • check-1 TRANSPORT:
  • check-1 All transfers and sightseeing by an air-conditioned vehicle with a courteous experienced professional driver so you can easily sit back, relax and enjoy the tour in complete privacy. Drivers of our private vehicles are experienced with good knowledge of the road conditions and well trained. Main roads in Pakistan are usually very busy with an assortment of vehicles from the biggest trucks (who always have right of way) down to bikes (and animals!). Overtaking on blind corners at speed is common as is the total use of the horn as a form of communication. If you are uncomfortable with your driver, please always let your tour guide know immediately.
  • check-1 TRAVEL TIMES: Distances in Pakistan do not reflect the driving time and to cover hundred km may take much longer than you would expect at home, even if much of the route is on a highway. The type of vehicles provided are as follows;
  • check-1 Passenger Vehicle type
  • check-1 • 1-2 persons Air-conditioned medium car such as Toyota Corolla or similar
  • check-1 • 3-4 persons Air-conditioned large car such as Toyota MPV or similar
  • check-1 • 5-10 persons Air-conditioned mini-van such as Toyota Hiace/Commuter or similar
  • check-1 • 10-15 persons Air-conditioned mini-van such as Toyota Coaster or similar
  • check-1 GUIDE:
  • check-1 The aim of the guide is to take the hassle out of your travels and to help you have the best trip possible. We provide English speaking local guides at each destination of your trip, the chosen local guide will strike a great balance between knowledgeable storytelling, humor, and giving you sufficient space and personal time to enjoy the awe-inspiring sites. Your guide will provide information on the places you are travelling through, offer suggestions for things to do and see, recommend great local eating venues and introduce you to our local friends. If you were interested in diving deeper into the local culture at a specific site, you can count on your assigned local speaking guide.
  • check-1 ADDITIONAL SERVICES:
  • check-1 Sightseeing as per the itinerary (However you have the flexibility to explore more )
  • check-1 Experienced professional English-speaking driver and guide throughout tour
  • check-1 Arrival and departure airport transfers
  • check-1 Charging facilities
  • check-1 Personal assistance by our representative & offices during arrival and departure
  • check-1 All interstate taxes, permits, parking, road tax, toll taxes and fuel charges etc are included
  • check-1 All government applicable taxes and service charges
  • check-1 All the departures are guaranteed. Even if you are a single person, the tour will still depart.
  • check-1 24 x 7 Assistance.
  • check-1 First Aid Kit
  • check-1 Letter of Invitation (LOI) and supporting documents for visa processing
  • remove PASSPORTS AND VISAS :
  • remove All travelers listed on the Participant Information form must be in possession of a valid passport and all relevant visas. It is your responsibility to ensure that you have valid travel documentation, including but not limited to passports and visas, which meet the requirements of immigration and other Government authorities at every destination. If your itinerary includes travel to any other country besides Pakistan, please check on visa requirements for each country that you will visit. Any fines, penalties, payments or expenditures incurred as a result of such documents not meeting the requirements of those authorities will be your sole responsibility.
  • remove INSURANCE
  • remove Travel insurance is not covered in the tour price. You can organize travel insurance with your preferred insurance company. We recommend World Nomads, RoamRight.
  • remove FLIGHTS
  • remove The flight tickets are not included in the package cost. Once you tell us the dates of your travel, we will advise you the exact flight fare.
  • remove International flight tickets have to be booked on your own, once you book your flight tickets, please share with us your schedule so that we can arrange your smooth pick-up and drop off from airport to hotel on your arrival day and hotel to the airport on the departure day.
  • remove To enter the airport, you must have a copy of your flight ticket and passport. Schedule changes and delays do occur, especially when weather conditions make visibility poor.
  • remove OPTIONAL
  • remove If you want to upgrade Hotels or Vehicle, we can definitely do that. Please contact us for more information.
  • remove Additional Services
  • remove Monument Entrance & Camera Fee
  • remove Airport and departure taxes
  • remove Hotels- early check-in and late check-out
  • remove Cost incurred from early leaving the trip
  • remove Travel Insurance of member
  • remove Any airfare (International or Domestic)
  • remove Any mandatory Gala Dinner of any occasion
  • remove Any item of personal nature viz. Laundry
  • remove Charges, telephone bills, drinks, shopping, etc
  • remove Any items that is not mentioned under Inclusions Pre and post tour accommodation
  • remove Single supplement (Optional)
  • remove Excess days beyond the itinerary
  • remove Lunch and dinner. We make stop at clean and quality restaurant. You may dine as you wish.
  • remove Satellite phone with solar charger (can hire)
  • remove Any expenses arising out of unforeseen circumstances like flight delay/cancellation/hike in fare, strike or any other natural calamities
  • remove • Tips : Tipping is a common custom and we always suggest our travelers to comply. No tip is compulsory, however in case of good services rendered, it is advisable to pay by a few rupees (driver / guide)

Tour's Location

FAQs

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Is it possible for me to store extra clothing that i will not need?
Yes, if you have a small bag of extra clothing for when you return from the trek, you will be able to store it safely in Islamabad for the duration of the trip.
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Is there anything I need to know on visiting religious sites?
Is there anything I need to know on visiting religious sites?
Remember to dress on a little more conservatively while planning to visit religious sites. Also, you may need to take off your shoes or remove all the leather items while entering any temples and monasteries. But you need not to worry as our guide will alert you when such situation arises. Moreover, confirm that photography is allowed or not before taking any snaps. Keep in mind that some sites might not admit women or might be reserved for followers of that faith.
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Who will my guide be?
All of our guides are highly skilled experienced professionals who have been selected based on their careful judgment, local knowledge, understanding of our client's needs, patience and supportive guiding styles, and great personalities. In addition to their impressive personal achievements in the field, our guides bring a wealth of natural history, cultural anthropology and linguistic knowledge for their group's enlightenment. Our guides and staff surpass the needs of our clientele and make the trip enjoyable beyond expectations.
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Can we customize trips?
We loves to customize personal trips -- for you, your friends, or organization. Our published land costs are typically based on number of individuals, so the number in your party may affect your land costs. Just give us a call/contact us and let us know what you're interested in, and we'll do our best to Make It Happen.
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Who will be picking me up and where?
Our guide or representative will pick you up at the airport on the scheduled arrival date. We can help you arrange accommodations if you arrive earlier, and we are happy to make suggestions for transportation, restaurants and sightseeing.
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Can i request single accommodations?
All accommodations are based on double or triple occupancy. If you are traveling solo and wish to share accommodations, we will pair you with another traveler of same gender. If you request single accommodations or a roommate cannot be assigned, you will be responsible for paying the single supplement fee.
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What if i want to arrive earlier or depart later than the trip dates?
We are happy to help you arrange accommodations before and after your trip. Our area directors can recommend side excursions and restaurants for the extra time.

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Should I tip my guide?
Tipping is always a personal choice, but is greatly appreciated by your guides. Check your departure packet for details.
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Are there any restrictions for the Photography in Pakistan ?
Pakistani love to take pictures and photograph themselves !
Do not forget your camera !
Photography is a great fun in Pakistan as you will have enough sunlight most of the time. In some of the monuments one has to pay fee for the photography. Our guide will suggest you where it is worth to photograph and where not. At some of the locations photography is not allowed. It is prohibited to photograph military installations, which can include some the train stations, bridges and airports also.Do not photograph these objects otherwise your film can be confiscated.
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Reserving a trip: how quickly do the trips fill up?
There is no way to know how quickly our trips are going to fill up. Many of our trips fill up months in advance. So send in your application and a deposit as soon as you have decided which trip date you want.

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How do i sign up for a trip?
You can sign up for the trip directly on our website. To secure your place on this trip, please click on the BOOK NOW button at the side of the page, or the dates tab to the right. You will also need to have the below information to hand:
• Name as per Passport
• Home Address
• Email Address
• Telephone Number
• Date of Birth

Before you embark on your trip, it is essential that we receive your passport, travel insurance, next of kin, medical details and dietary requirements (if applicable). If you have any medical conditions to declare or are over the age of 65, you will be required to complete a medical declaration form, signed and stamped by your GP. If you don’t have all this information to hand, you can still register your place today, and then re-log into the form before you depart by using your email address and the password you create upon registration.
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What is the deposit amount to hold my space?
US$300 for scheduled trips. An application alone won’t reserve a space.
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What happens if VE has to cancel my trip?
If we cancels a trip due to any reason, you will receive a full refund.
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What is the recommended age and denomination of USD bills?
There is no specific age of USD bills, however, we recommend the guests to carry new crisp bills when traveling. All denominations are acceptable, however, it is easier if you have smaller denominations of 5’s, 10’s and 20’s.
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can I extend my trip ?
Yes – why not stay on and explore more of what Pakistan has to offer! We can request with to change your return date with the airline. Places are limited and all arrangements are subject to availability.
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How is VE able to offer such competitive prices?
Our unique style of off the beaten track, face-to-face travel is the only way to really experience a destination, but it also serves to keep the costs down. We spend your money providing an authentic experience, instead of on lavish hotels and expensive western-style meals. We pass these savings on to you with our low prices. Another thing you'll notice are the inclusions. While we don't include everything, we do throw in the major highlights of a destination, the things that everyone goes to see. On every trip page we show you the 'Included Highlights' of your trip, things that many other companies charge locally for. We leave many other activities as options, to provide you the freedom and flexibility to choose what you want to do on a daily basis.
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What should I pack ?
It will depend essentially on your destination and the season of your departure.
It all depends on your destination and season of travel. Much of Pakistan has a patchy climate: warmer in the days and cooler in the evenings. A light jacket or layering is best to accommodate the varying temperatures. Also, we suggest shoes that are comfortable for walking, including sandals and tennis shoes. A head cover may be required for women and men at certain sacred sites and places of worship.
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When is the best time to travel ?
It will depend on your destination, the season and the activities you have chosen :-)The southern zones are the good destinations in the winter months (November to March), as temperatures are mild and game viewing in the national parks will be the best options. Comparatively winter temperatures in the north may become harsh, but this is an excellent time for bird watching, as the migrant species arrive in this period.
It really depends on your destination, activities and season of travel. In much of Northern, the favored time to visit is from April – November, when the weather is most mild, while October - March is the best time to visit Southern and Central Pakistan. Our destination specialists will recommend certain travel times after learning more about your preferences.
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How is Gilgit Baltistan as a destination? Which places can we see in winter?
Gilgit Gilgit Baltistan is a beautiful destination. So much so, that one should definitely plan a visit to this cold desert as a bucket list check box. With beautiful lakes and treks to offer, Gilgit Gilgit Baltistan is a must-visit place to go to. In winter, the temperature in Gilgit Gilgit Baltistan drops down severely and becomes even more picturesque. One can visit the frozen lakes, if not the Baltoro trek, one can do the trek on the Shigar, Khaplu valleys, visit Gilgit Gilgit Baltistani festivals that help you interact with the locals as well.
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How should i travel around in pakistan ?
The best way to travel within Pakistan is to travel by road as this offers you an opportunity to have a glimpse of real PAKISTAN as you can visit en-route villages and small forts at your own pace which is not possible by air or by train.
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Do you have experienced guides in different cities of pakistan ?
We have English speaking guides all over PAKISTAN. At many places , we also have french , German , Spanish ,Italian and Japenese and other language speaking guides. We can also provide accompanying foreign language speaking tourist guides for individuals and groups. The availability of foreign language speaking guides can be confirmed at the time of reservation.
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who will i meet on my arrival in pakistan ?
You will be greeted by our representative at airport on your arrival. He shall be holding a placard of your name for identification. We shall also provide you list of emergency 24 hours contact numbers for any emergency.
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Is the country safe to travel?
Pakistan is as secure as any other foreign location you visit for the first time. Pakistani people are very hospitable and helpful people. Moreover, we will be there to take care of you in every step of your way and to instruct certain basic precautions. Like it is a very good idea to lock away your spare currency, traveler’s cheques, passports and precious jewellery in the hotel safe. Moreover, be aware while walking around alone at late night, particularly in the deserted areas or small towns because everything closes early. If possible, avoid travelling late night and never leave your luggage unattended at the airport or train station.
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Do I need a visa to travel to Pakistan?
This must be obtained before arrival and we recommend that you contact your local Pakistani embassy or consulate when planning your trip.
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What is a customized itinerary?
In brief a customized itinerary is an itinerary prepared according to your personal needs. After all, you would have requested this to us as part of the process of customization. Your specific interest, preferences and needs are weighted with our knowledge of logistics and highlights of the area.
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What currency is used in Pakistan and where can I exchange money?
The Pakistann currency is the rupee, which is made of 100 paisa. Major currencies such as US dollars, British pounds and Euros are easily exchanged throughout Pakistan. Most international airports of the country have the money exchange counters, and also some selected larger hotels and resorts have this facility to their customer.
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Can I use my credit card in Pakistan?
Of course the most regularly used cards are Visa and MasterCard, but neither American Express nor Dinner’s Club are broadly accepted in Pakistan. While you are going out of the main cities to the small places, it is recommended that you carry enough Pakistann currency for purchasing and tipping purpose.
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Where can I find an ATM in Pakistan?
ATMs linked to the international networks are situated in the main cities, as well as an increasing number of the smaller towns. But, make sure that you have a four-digit PIN code for your card, as Pakistann ATMs require this.
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What is the electricity supply in Pakistan and what plugs are used?
The electricity supply is 230 – 240 volt, with three round pin plugs. Most western visitors will require an adaptor. If you plan to travel a lot in the future, it is better to get a combination voltage converter and a plug adapter.
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Will I be able to access the internet?
Internet connections are available in the most part and places of Pakistan and are reasonably fast, except in some more remote rural areas. Wi-Fi access is accessible at most good hotels and growing number of cafés in the larger cities.
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Is Pakistan a good destination for family traveler?
With its many diverse landscapes and attractions, Pakistan is an admirable destination for the family traveler. Some of the good options are beach holidays and wildlife adventures in the national parks, while many monuments have sight and light shows that will capture children’s imagination. For teenagers, the many outdoor activities, such as camel safari and trekking, are an illustrative card. Without the second thinking, the big challenge for families travelling in this country might be the distances that need to be covered between cities. Air travel and railway journeys are usually the most comfortable forms of traveling, and are strongly recommended to those with the young children.
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How clean are the hotels?
Pakistan's five and four star hotels are pretty much like any high quality western hotel and many of them are the western hotel chains. But then the quality drops dramatically to three star hotels.
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What kind of food will I be able to eat in Pakistan?
Pakistani cuisine has several variations, with each region famous for its own techniques, ingredients and spices. In northern regions, meat dishes are very popular, which are usually made with chicken, mutton or lamb whereas in southern part vegetarian cuisine is most favored. In addition, seafood is also readily available, particularly at the coast. While Pakistani cuisine tends to be spicy, most restaurants will gladly prepare a milder variation of the meals on the request of their customer.
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Is the tap water safe to drink in Pakistan?
It’s best to avoid drinking the tap water. Bottled water is easily available, but it’s a good idea to check that the seal on the bottle is undamaged or not before you purchase it. In every area for the tourists packed bottled water is recommended. Though, local brands are also available but it's recommended to use the some popular and major brands like Nestle, Aquafina and Kinley to save you from the unwelcomed problem.
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Should i wear closed in shoes to protect my feet from dirt & germs?
In the cooler months, you may want to have closed in shoes because it is cold. In the warmer weather and areas, you will probably be more comfortable in open sandals or slip-off shoes. Additionally, you will likely find that you need to take your shoes off regularly when going into mosques/shops/temples etc and slip offs are quick and easy.

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